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Rebecca L. Walkowitz
 
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Rebecca L. Walkowitzís teaching and research areas include twentieth- and twenty-first-century literatures in English, especially the British novel, modernist fiction and prose, the contemporary Anglophone novel, and the novel in translation; other interests include the theory of the novel; world literature; translation studies; cosmopolitanism; and theories of reading.

She has recently published Born Translated: The Contemporary Novel in an Age of World Literature. In this project, Walkowitz considers how the idea of world literature, as a network of multilingual editions and audiences, has changed the aesthetic strategies and formal properties of contemporary writing. Born Translated recasts literary history as a series of convergences and divergences and builds a much-needed framework for reading translationís effects on fictional works. It is the first monograph to consider how the idea of world literature, as a network of multilingual editions and audiences, has changed the aesthetic strategies and formal dimensions of contemporary writing.

With Eric Hayot, she has edited a volume of experimental essays by leading scholars in the fields of world literature and modernist studies. A New Vocabulary for Global Modernism shows how the intellectual paradigms we've long associated with modernism are transformed, and how new paradigms emerge, when modernism's archive extends beyond the European center. It also explores how our methodologies change when we approach modernism comparatively and when we draw out modernism's own engagement with ideas of the world.

Her current project is Future Reading, a book about the new multilingualism of contemporary fiction.

     
     
   

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