Rutgers Young Horse Teaching & Research Program
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RU Rosie, RU Pardner with RU Glinda, RU Casanova, RU Brisa and RU Genesis

Horse Course Syllabi
Horse Management
Equine Nutrition
Research In Animal Science-Young Horse Program
Horse Practicum

Click here to read about pre-purchase considerations--
things you should know before buying a young horse.

Question & Answer

Mustang F.A.Qs
(Frequent Asked Questions)

Question / Problem:

Where did the American mustangs originate?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

How many mustangs are currently roaming the range?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

Why does the US government round them up?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

What do mustangs look like?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

What is that white mark on a mustang’s neck?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

How “wild” are the horses when they are first purchased?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

Why did the Rutgers Young Horse Teaching and Research Program decide to purchase mustangs?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

Where did the Rutgers mustangs come from?

Answer:

Data for mustang questions provided by the BLM: http://www.blm.gov/

Draft Cross Question/ Problems from the first 10 years:

I am adopting a 6 month PMU Percheron.  Can you tell me what a horse of his age should be eating?  Is there any other advice that you can offer for his first several weeks here?

Answer:

    Question/Problem:

    A Percheron/Arabian cross yearling suddenly looses ability to balance, and can barely stand.  X-Rays reveal slight pinching of the nerves in the spinal cord.  He is diagnosed as “growing too fast”, and although surgery is a possibility, the recommendation is to wait and see if he outgrows the problem.  He was being fed what his owners understood be a good balance feed because of its low carbohydrate content.

Answer:

    Question/ Problems:

    How to feed a draft/warm-blood mare and draft/warm-blood cross foal from pregnancy to post-weaning? I know that I need to be cautious about how I feed my mare while she is pregnant, but I also want to be as proactive as possible. Can you lend any advice on how I should feed her prior to breeding, while pregnant, and then how/what the mare and foal should eat once the foal is born?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

  I recently purchased a foal. He is out of a Belgian Mare by a Hanoverian Thoroughbred X Stallion. I'm giving him free choice first cutting hay (next week it will be switched to second cutting hay). He and another horse share a flake of alfalfa. As far as the grain side of it goes I'm not sure what to feed. I don't like commercial mixed feeds. I don't want to feed soy because of the estrogen in it,commercial feed are cooked and that destroys the vitamins and enzymes and I don't trust what goes in it.

    Right now I'm feeding steam rolled oats, stabilized rice meal and flax seed meal for grain. I'm giving probios (a digestive aide) and a supplement from Uckele (their base mix). When I had my last babies 15 years ago I was told to feed them that same amount of grain that you would feed an adult horse. Now I was told just to feed a couple of pounds. How much should he get? Also with this cross of horse (Belgian) do I have to worry about OCD?

Answer:

Question / Problem:

    I am hoping you can help me.  I adopted a 5MO old Begian Draft Horse a month ago and am struggling on what to feed him.  He was one of the survivors of the overturned trailer heading to Canada for slaughter on October 28th in Wadworth, Illinois.  I have had him on Buckeye's Grow and Win (which is what I have fed my quarter horses and warmbloods) but found it to cause this poor colt much diarrhea.  I started him on the Buckeye Growth Formula and he did well but is also rapidly putting on weight which I don't think is necessarily good.



Here is an article written by Dr. Sarah Ralston with Christine Barakat on how to feed growing horses.

To view the article please- click here.

The Equine Science Center of Rutgers University is a fantastic resource for information regarding a variety of equine topics.  Two of their many fact-sheets regarding equine nutrition are linked below: (click the title to access the article)

Analysis of Feeds and Forages for Horses” by Dr. Sarah Ralston

The Basics of Equine Nutrition” by Dr. Carey Williams








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For questions about the program or the website, please contact Dr. Sarah Ralson at ralston@aesop.rutgers.edu



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