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Rutgers Young Horse Teaching & Research

RU ShyAnne
"Shy"


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Photo by S. Ralston
  • BLM Freezebrand 08854137
  • Bay 3-year-old Filly
  • Mustang # 4137
  • Born Summer 2008
  • Captured from the Muskrat Basin HMA, WY on July 14, 2009
  • Will be registered with the Wild Horse and Burro Association
  • Sponsors: Dr. and Mrs. Bill Meyer, Carol O'Scanlon, and Julie Richards
  • Students: Pam Brzezynski and Lauren Wheeler

March 2011

    We are in the home stretch now! Just a month left until ShyAnne and her foal get to go to her hopeful new home. All the mustangs are now at the Red Barn on College Farm Road on Cook Campus. The move went very smoothly and all of them are settling in, getting used to the new “spookies” of the Red Barn and they are all greatly enjoying the bigger turnout fields to run around in.

    ShyAnne is getting closer and closer to her foaling time! She is currently 1020 lbs and looks like she waddling around, so keep an eye out for a new foal announcement!! Besides being very pregnant, Shy is settling in very well at the new barn, and is greatly enjoying her change in diet, being back on hay and hay cubes. Nothing seems to faze her, and she is taking each new challenge presented to her very willingly. She is getting used to the clippers, so she no longer looks like a shaggy bear, and this week she was introduced to the spray bottle. Hopefully the warmer weather will come soon so we can start introducing the hose and ‘bath time’ to her! Ag Field Day sessions have started and Shy’s student is working well with her. Shy will not be participating in the Ag Field Day activities for we are pretty sure that she will have a foal at her side by then.

Written by Pam Brzezynski

February 2011

    ShyAnne’s pregnancy is quickly coming towards an end now. She has begun bagging up and we are expecting the baby in about one more month. Dr. McAlister came to see her the other day and performed an ultrasound! We were able to see the baby’s eye and he inspected her uterine artery as well as the placenta. We were happy to see that there is no placentitis and we all have our fingers crossed for a healthy young foal in the next month or so. Shy’s training is coming along nicely although we are not able to do anything too strenuous with her anymore. She is becoming much more confident. We have been desensitizing her to as many objects as we can and she was not even afraid of the electric clippers shaving her beard! We have been practicing turning on both the haunches and the forehand in the aisles of the barn. She listens well and crosses over her feet almost every time. She is learning “head down” and will put her nose all the way to floor for me when I remove her halter.

Written by Lauren Wheeler

January 2011

    ShyAnne’s progress is coming along nicely. Of course that baby is still growing, over the break she had been gaining 5lbs a week! We have a guessed due date for the foal to be around March-April. So watch out for the baby pictures! Her training is moving along, we saw huge progress with the farrier coming out for the second round of trimmings and Shy was an all-star at lifting all of her feet and standing nicely. Also, Jose is helping train Shy again this semester. Our current goals are to get Shy desensitized to anything and everything we can, some basic round pen work so she knows how to eventually be lunged, and getting her more confident in being lead around the barn.

Written by Pam Brzezynski

December 2010
 
    ShyAnne is moving right along in her ground manner progress! She got her first ever “pedicure” when the farrier visited and trimmed all the horses a few weeks ago. Shy was not too sure about getting her hooves trimmed down at that point in time, so we have been working very hard on getting her to lift and hold her feet up.  Along with working on her feet, we are continuing to work with her on her ground skills such as walking calmly while being lead from both sides, standing still for a small period of time, backing up, turning to both the left and right. ShyAnne is a fast learner and is willing to do what she is asked of by her handlers. Today’s challenge was walking on the new scale, which is raised off of the ground and makes loud noises when hooves and students' shoes hit it. Shy was a rockstar and walked right up, sniffed it, then walked on as if it was an everyday thing.

    In her weekly sessions with Jose, Shy is learning and still working on her round penning skills. That is responding to Jose asking her to halt and turn into to him or to halt and change direction. Shy is starting to become more friendly towards Jose, but she still isn’t very sure if she totally trust him yet (hence her name). Out in the field Shy runs the show and is most definitely the boss mare telling everyone what they can and cannot do. Annie O. seems to be her pasture best friend, and these two are usually found standing together looking out at the other horses - usually Koda and Sunny - playing halter tag, or staring off at the traffic out on Route 1.


    ShyAnne would like to wish the best of luck to her student Melissa Reese, as she is graduating this December and hopes Melissa comes back to visit often, because she will be greatly missed.


Written by Pam Brzezynski
 
November 2010
 
    The most exciting news from the past month is probably the confirmation that ShyAnne is pregnant. The vet estimated that she is about 5 months along, and Dr. Ralston expects that she may have the baby sometime in April, possibly before the auction! The prospect of a foal watch has many of the research students excited. We are all keeping our fingers crossed that the pregnancy continues to go smoothly.

    ShyAnne has also been making good progress in her training. She is now completely accustomed to wearing a halter during the day, and she is used to having it put on and taken off by any of Dr. Ralston’s students. She leads easily from both sides. At first, she was actually better to lead from the right (the “wrong” side). Now she leads just as well from the left. Every so often, she still reminds us that she just seems to be a “right-handed” horse.

    She is doing well with accepting new things. She likes to be groomed, and we are now working on picking up her feet. Our goal is to get her ready to have her feet trimmed by the farrier as soon as possible. Shy is also very good with her commands to halt and back up. She knows to move away from pressure, and we have already started working on turns-on-the-forehand and turns-on-the-haunches. She is very smart and very responsive to light cues.

    Shy has not been fearful about exploring the barn. She walks nicely onto the scale to be weighed. She doesn’t hesitate when she is lead down the aisle to be turned out. She is even curious about the cat. Her confidence with people has also greatly improved. Now she is much more willing to approach and interact with people than she was before. We have also been working with her in the round pen, slowly desensitizing her to different objects. I have worked her in the round pen at the walk and trot, practicing changes of direction. Today I lunged her for the first time, and she quickly understood what to do. We will continue to perfect and expand these skills in the coming months.

Written by Melissa Reese

October 2010

    ShyAnne is improving quite nicely!  Shy greatly enjoys her going-outside time, she is much happier, more relaxed and ready to work. We have learned she can be a bit bossy around her fellow field buddies, just making sure they stay in line when turned out.  The past few weeks she has started the process of learning to pick up her feet, in preparation for eventual hoof picking and future trims from the farrier. Shy is definitely a fast learner and is willing to complete, or at least give a good try, new tasks that face her in our research tests.

Written by Pam Brzezynski





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