[Date Prev][Date Next][Date Index]

Cures



Thank goodness my family were Baptists and feared psychologists.  If they
had been Episcopalians, they would have shipped me off to therapy as soon
as I told them about my first adolescent homosexual inclinations. 
Instead, they taught me abstinence and prayer.  Puberty was miserable, but
somehow I survived it.  I did not come out to myself until I was 28. 
(Apparently everyone else had known all along.) 

The next year, when I entered graduate school (1965), I had already
accepted my homosexuality as integral to who I am.  As a relatively new
Episcopalian, I decided to be more enlightened and try psychological
therapy;  I wanted to learn ways to cope with stress.  As a matter of
course I identified myself as gay in the preliminary interview.  One of
the staff psychologists noted this on the forms of the clinic and asked to
meet with me.  When I did, he urged me to try his new 'cure' for
homosexuality. 

"But I am not sick," I explained; "I am having stress related to my
intense study right now; my stress is not related to my affectional
preference at all, as I explained in the interview." 

"Ah, but just think how much more freedom you would have as a
heterosexual,"  the psychologists explained.  "No one could ever blackmail
you. You would have no fears about losing your job....."

"And how do you propose to make me into a heterosexual?" I asked, more to
humor him than out of any desire to change.  

"It's called Behavioral Modification.  It's quite successful.  We would
reward you for correct responses to sexual stimulae and mildly punish you
for incorrect responses...."

He explained that they would wire my genitals with electrical gadgets and
then have me look at pornography.  If I responded to males in pornography,
they would give me mild shocks; but if I responded to females in
pornography they would reward me.   I did not stick around to find out
what the rewards might be.  Banana pellets?  A chocolate bar?

Later the creators of that kind of therapy abandoned it and discredited it
as bad psychology.  But the article below shows that it won't go away.  So
long as there's money to be made, some folks will stoop to anything. We
even have a few professors in our seminaries who go for this kind of
thing, encouraging priests to prey upon homosexual persons who have been
successfully taught to loathe themselves. 

Where is Samson when we really need him to take on such Philistines?

Lutibelle/Louie


Louie Crew, Box 30, Nwk, NJ 07101 973-485-4503. 
http://newark.rutgers.edu/~lcrew/lbg_edir.html "The best way to find out
about new research on issues of sexuality"--Chronicle of Higher Education

                There are  194  days until the end of the 1900s.
		But would you know it?!

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Sun, 20 Jun 1999 20:17:27 -0500
From: James Edward Mackay <grandjeu@uswest.net>
To: Dr Louie Crew <lcrew@andromeda.rutgers.edu>
Subject: Yuck

>From today's issue of The Sunday Times [London].

Eeek.

James
> June 20 1999 BRITAIN
>
> 'Gay cure' therapy offered on NHS
>
> by Lois Rogers
> Medical Correspondent
>
> DOCTORS claiming to "cure" homosexuality are offering a range of
> controversial therapies on the NHS. The treatment - known as aversion
> therapy - involves attempting to instil a loathing for gay sex. Such
> therapies were thought to have been abandoned after homosexuality was
> decriminalised in 1967, but new evidence indicates that some survive.
> A leading psychiatrist has described how he recently treated a
> 24-year-old man for "sexual orientation". John Kellett, a consultant
> psychiatrist at St George's hospital in south London, reported in
> Trends in Urology, a medical journal, that the therapy was successful.
>
>
> The patient, the son of an army sergeant, sought treatment because he
> wanted to have a conventional marriage and children. Kellett treated
> the man, who worked in a City broking firm, by attempting to steer the
> focus of sexual arousal towards pornographic magazines and female
> clothing. After a period of months, he said, the man reported that he
> was cured and subsequently regarded his homosexuality as "an
> aberration which was vaguely repulsive".
>
> Last week Kellett admitted that he had not kept in touch with the
> patient to check whether he had remained heterosexual. "I suspect it
> is like alcoholism: if such people have a disaster in their lives,
> they may well relapse," he said.
>
> Other health workers said they continued to use aversion treatments
> for gay patients. Philip Soker, an NHS psycho-analyst, maintained that
> he would not try to change someone who did not want it. But he said he
> had used behaviour modification therapies: "I don't think there is any
> evidence that sexuality is determined biologically. People can
> convince themselves they are of a particular sexual orientation when
> they are not."
>
> Mental health and homosexual rights groups believe pyschiatrists
> offering the therapy are simply demonstrating their own prejudices.
> They are campaigning for an end to such practices, which they believe
> can cause long-term mental illness.
>
> Mike King, professor of psychiatry at the Royal Free Hospital in
> London, said: "I still get people referred to my clinic who have been
> told their sexuality is a disease, and we do see people who have been
> thoroughly messed up by attempts at treatment."
>
> Peter Price, 53, a gay radio broadcaster in Liverpool, recently
> revealed his experience of such therapy during the 1960s. More than
> 700 people have since contacted him to say they had received similar
> treatment. Many of them said they had not recovered from the
> psychological trauma.
>
> Price said he agreed to undergo treatment because his mother could not
> bear the idea of her 18-year-old son being homosexual. "I was locked
> up alone in a mental institution for 72 hours with supposedly gay
> pornograpy, and given drugs to make me vomit and become incontinent,"
> he said.
>
> "There was no lavatory and no water supply in the room. They said the
> next part of the treatment was to apply electrodes to my genitals.
> After three days I begged to be let out."
>
> Such is the level of concern about the long-term damage suffered by
> many homosexual men and women that King has this month been awarded a
> 400,000 grant from the national lottery fund, to be shared with
> mental health charity Mind. They will investigate links between
> various types of aversion therapy and later psychological problems,
> such as depression, in gay people.
>
> Homosexuality ceased to be classified as a mental disorder by the
> World Health Organisation only in 1992.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Next page: BBC plans move to South Bank
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Next: BBC plans move to South Bank
>
>
>
> Copyright 1999 Times Newspapers Ltd. This service is provided on Times
> Newspapers' standard terms and conditions. To inquire about a licence
> to reproduce material from The Sunday Times, visit the Syndication
> website.




     JAMES EDWARD MACKAY + Fargo  North Dakota
                         + grandjeu@uswest.net
                         + evensong@uswest.net





Please sign my guestbook and view it.


My site has been accessed times since February 14, 1996.

Statistics courtesy of WebCounter.